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9/25/2019
Topic:
Repairing chair legs.

Phillip Dare
Phillip Dare
Posts: 1
Hi, I'm new to this and not sure how to re-join loose chair legs.
Which is the best way to place the screws?.
9/24/2019
Topic:
Help! I'm so new.

Chris Kelly
Chris Kelly
Posts: 1
I highly recommend building something a bit easier then a table as your 'first project'.
8/29/2019
Topic:
Woodworking with a physical disability

Shari Ford
Shari Ford
Posts: 1
While it hasn't affected me to the point of threatening my ability to accomplish most tasks, I have had to adapt to changes in my health in the realm of wood working and crafting. I have Crohn's disease and as a result I have an ostomy, so I have a tool belt I've modified to not only divert tools away from my bag, but also stabilizes the base of my bag so it can't accidentally be tugged away. This tool belt has also been used (both while woodworking and not) to hold the pump for temporary feeding tubes on two occasions.
I also have signs everywhere around my workstation reminding me to eat and stay hydrated. I have a small, fold up step stool I keep close by at all times so I can sit and rest whenever necessary.
8/6/2019
Topic:
How to best clean and store router bits?

SAKET KUMAR
SAKET KUMAR
Posts: 1
Doug Prior wrote:
I buy quality router bits and would like to hear what others are doing to clean them after a project is complete. I am also interested to know if anyone has a build plan for a router bit storage cabinet. I can build one but am interested in what others have done.




I am also interested to know it. I have one more question not related to this question: Which router is best fit for the Bosch router tables?
6/11/2019
Topic:
Help! I'm so new.

Lindsey Dobson
Lindsey Dobson
Posts: 1
I very much would like to build a few things I'm in desperate need of but I don't know how to start! My first project will be a kitchen table - I found a DIY table on the Youtube channel The Rehab Life but it is too big. How do I downsize everything without messing it up?
5/3/2019
Topic:
Woodworking with a physical disability

Lee Caron
Lee Caron
Posts: 1
Hi everyone. I'm new to the forum, though I've been a happy Buildsomething member for a few years now. I'm hoping my request/enquiry gains some traction, because it's a very high impact issue. I'm talking about woodworking for people with physical limitations/"disabilities". I won't try arguing in favor because the reasons are self-evident and shouldn't need to be justified.

A quick background on my interest in the subject. I'm a middle age nurse. A few years ago I was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis (MS), which necessitated going on disability. I was still able to do a lot of stuff, and I had a sudden glut of time on my hands. I'd worked since I was 14, and all the empty time drove me nuts. I had no reason to get out of bed in the morning. Then I discovered two things that would give my life some purpose: light landscaping/gardening and woodworking. The gardening keeps me occupied from May through Halloween, and woodworking the rest of the time and as needed during the summer.

I've been slowly losing function thanks to the MS. It affects my balance (Yikes! in a woodworking shop setting), fine motor skills, coordination, and loss of strength in general. For the first couple of years, the loss of functions were gradual enough that I could make adaptations unconsciously. This past winter I had a major relapse which left me with permanent loss of function in my right foot and significant weakness in my upper leg. Unfortunately, the relapse came in conjunction with an unrelated surgery for a rotator cuff tear. That left me with a double whammy, an arm I couldn't use, and a leg that didn't want to work. Toss on the arthritis and vision changes that come with middle age and I'm facing the need to adapt to a slew of disabilities large and small.

I am not the only one. I know a good many of the community's members are dealing with the same issues. I would love to hear what others have done to adapt to the challenges physical disabilities, large and small. An example of "small"? Using a drill to sharpen a pencil, or using reading glasses for detail work. An example of "large"? Building a portable table saw stand at the correct height, or (major) build a ramp for wheelchair access. Is there anything you've developed over the years to make it easier for you to work around your "can't do" list?

I think this is an important subject. I would love to see if anyone has any adaptations I can use in my struggle to keep building. It doesn't matter what the disability is: limb amputations,diabetes, vision impairment, cardiac, respiratory, etc etc. The adaptation is the point, not so much the disability itself. I think this would be a great way for us to share our strength and help fellow woodworking devotees otherwise facing the need to give up their beloved hobby.
2/19/2019
Topic:
Simple Accessories for Straight Plywood Cuts

Cassandra Cotten
Cassandra Cotten
Posts: 2
What plat form should I be rip cutting on top of?
2/19/2019
Topic:
Question about table saws.

Cassandra Cotten
Cassandra Cotten
Posts: 2
Derek
I just got a ryobi portable table saw for Christmas. Not exactly what I would’ve purchased but I’m grateful as I’ve never owned nor have I ever used one. A lot of woodwork I’ve watched has the nice large table saws and they make it look so easy and the boards just rip right through. I did not know that most of the “table saws” I’ve seen were actually cabinet saws. Can you explain to me the main differences of the table saws?
2/13/2019
Topic:
Getting a plywood sheet home

Wooden Wookie
Wooden Wookie
Posts: 1
I'm not sure about where you live but in New Zealand most shops have a trailer for hire here so if you have a towbar on your car then just ask to use their trailers. Most of the shops here allow you to use the trailers for free which is pretty great.

I just have to get a towbar for my car.

Also some shops sell half sheets which will fit in a station wagon.
2/10/2019
Topic:
How to Create Project Illustrations with SketchUp

Brian Drake
Brian Drake
Posts: 1
Is there a reason that the plans listed on this website are not available in "Sketchup" format? That would make it so much easier to download, adjust and print.
1/15/2019
Topic:
Question about table saws.

Derek Shaw
Derek Shaw
Posts: 1
Anthony Hoskin wrote:
I am starting to get into woodworking and I need a table saw but I don’t really have the budget for a professional table saw yet. I have been looking at a portable Ryobi 10” table saw but a couple of reviews I have read said that saws like this are not good for woodworking. Would really appreciate if someone could give me a little advice.


Depends on your needs, your budget, the space you're willing to commit to a tool like this and how much you think you'll use it in the near future. Cabinet saws(like a Unisaw) are the best, next in line are contractor saws and then the portables(like the DeWalt). Contractor saws can be found used for cheaper than a new portable saw, will typically have larger beds(better) and cast iron(again, better). They can also often be found with upgraded fences and extra accessories. There's pros and cons to all of these styles with the contractor's saw being in the middle as far as size, weight, accuracy, cut capacity, cost...

If your shop serves double duty as a garage like most people, a mobile base can be made or bought pretty cheap to wheel it out of the way when not being used.


What's your budget? Around 200$. As an example, Delta Unisaws, used, typically start at about $500 and go up to $2-3k. Delta contractor's saws can sometimes be found as low as $100, and maybe go up to $500 if they've been decked out with accessories like a better fence, router extension, out feed table, mobile base... Portable saws are in the $3-600 range new, cheaper used. While portable saws are usually not, contractor and cabinet saws also are easier to modify and upgrade

I'll always advise to buy more saw than what you think you need right now. Once you get a couple of smaller projects under your belt, you'll want tondo bigger stuff and need a bigger, better saw.
1/14/2019
Topic:
Question about table saws.

Everett Murphy
Everett Murphy
Posts: 1
I used a cheap table saw for many years before I inherited the one I own now. Take the time to square the fence with the saw blade and don't try to push the lumber too fast into the blade as the motor will likely bog down or stop. Start with small projects while you get used to the saw, use safety glasses and push sticks or push blocks to keep your hands away from the blade. A skilled woodworker with a cheap table saw can do amazing work. Get the best saw you can afford and learn to use it. Good luck and enjoy your new hobby!
1/9/2019
Topic:
Question about table saws.

Anthony Hoskin
Anthony Hoskin
Posts: 1
I am starting to get into woodworking and I need a table saw but I don’t really have the budget for a professional table saw yet. I have been looking at a portable Ryobi 10” table saw but a couple of reviews I have read said that saws like this are not good for woodworking. Would really appreciate if someone could give me a little advice.
10/15/2018
Topic:
Cold Weather Sanding

tovar linda
tovar linda
Posts: 1
I also find out about this, hoping to find the best answer! tik tok video
9/1/2018
Topic:
Strength of pocket joints

tom mercier
tom mercier
Posts: 1
I am making a router table. I will be using pocket screws to assemble the sides (4 boards 5 inches wide). The case will have a shelf attached in the middle to each side. My question is can I use pocket screws located on the inside of the sides to directly attach the top and bottom of the table. This would end up looking like simple bookshelf. Will this joint be srong enough with the top and bottom attached? Would you recommend I use a frame of some sort for additional stength? Thank you. This is my first project:-)
8/25/2018
Topic:
How to Create Project Illustrations

Robert Pique
Robert Pique
Posts: 2
good one
7/12/2018
Topic:
Paint Choices

Kat Allemand
Kat Allemand
Posts: 1
Kat Allemand
Kat Allemand
Posts: 1
Topic: Paint Choices
Hi there I have been refinishing furniture for over 12 years the best paint I have found is call Fusion paint ...milk paint works well too or any acrylic based interior paint. I have tried a lot of different type of paints over the years and this is what I have found works best if using a high traffic area ...use tap, a deglosser, Sand 320 and prime with an oil based primer use use about 6 layers of polyacrylic, medium traffic or wear still degloss,sand and prime. But your top coat doesn't have to be so thick, for a low traffic area do all the beginning steps but buff with a soft wax. If you have bleed through spray shellac on the area in which it is bleeding through.. I hope this helps!
4/28/2018
Topic:
Farmhouse Outdoor Glider Bench

Paul Goodwill
Paul Goodwill
Posts: 1
Has anyone experimented with different locations for the glider brackets?
4/8/2018
Topic:
Cold Weather Sanding

Jordan Killeen
Jordan Killeen
Posts: 1
Ok so maybe an odd question, but I was hoping someone with experience can answer it, because Google is drawing a blank.
I want to sand a table top I joined recently, but it is 25 F outside. Given that wood contains water, that may now be frozen, is this a bad idea?
I don't mind the cold, but will it be bad for the wood. Anyone with experience Have an answer?
2/11/2018
Topic:
Pockets on the inside or outside?

Kent Bruner
Kent Bruner
Posts: 1
One way to avoid shifting is to let the glue set for about 10 minutes and then drive the screws. If you don't have a lot of pieces but have a lot of patience then this works well.

You can also use dabs of hot glue spaced out across the end of the piece with yellow glue covering most of the wood. For instance, you may use 3 dabs of hot glue - one on each end and one in the middle - and regular wood glue between the dabs as you normally would apply it. Just enough hot glue to be a temporary clamp to prevent shifting.

Another way is to drive the screws without glue and then remove them, apply glue and reassemble.
edited by clg30522 on 2/11/2018