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Pockets on the inside or outside? Messages in this topic - RSS

Su Lee
Su Lee
Posts: 1


9/13/2016
Su Lee
Su Lee
Posts: 1
In the videos I notice when making something, say a simple box, the pockets are joined to the side piece from the outside and wood plugs are used to fill the holes. Why cant we put all the pockets facing inside? ( unless of course the piece is tiny and the driver wont fit)
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Build Something
Build Something
Administrator
Posts: 27


10/13/2016
Build Something
Build Something
Administrator
Posts: 27
Pocket holes can be placed on the interior and/or exterior of your project. Placement can vary based on project type, strength/holding power needs, personal preference, etc. Some people prefer to leave pocket holes exposed so that they can plug them with custom plugs for an accent. The main thing to ensure is that you are spacing pocket holes evenly across the workpiece. For wide parts such as panels, we recommend placing the first pocket hole 2" from the panel edge and every 6" to 8" on center after that. When drilling panels, you can use any drill guide hole.

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John Barr
John Barr
Posts: 2


10/21/2016
John Barr
John Barr
Posts: 2
It's to do with strength. Pocket holes on the inside have the screw heading towards the edge of the outer piece and therefore have less timber to grab which could lead to splitting. On the outside they have more timber to grab. I've also found that its easy to clamp using Kreg's right angle clamp or Rockler's pocket hole clamp when using the outside pocket holes and there is less chance of shifting when driving the screws. Having said that, inside pocket holes allow you to keep them hidden and are consequently neater, you just have to take a little more care with placement and clamping
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Mauricio Britva
Mauricio Britva
Posts: 2


1/8/2018
Mauricio Britva
Mauricio Britva
Posts: 2
John and others, great tips, Regarding shifting, I am having a hard time avoiding that. Say I am doing a 90 degree joint, all correct screws wood etc..., I apply glue to the ends and clamp, when I drive the screws, it the joint shifts and I do not get the flushed joint I had before. I see some people put some salt grains to help, but seems an added non convenient way. I even bought the very expensive pocket whole clamp and still sometimes see some shifting. Slowing down the driver seems to help but not always. Once shifted there is no way to put back in the flushed position anymore unless starting over. Any tips to avoid that? thanks in advance. Mo
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Kent Bruner
Kent Bruner
Posts: 1


2/11/2018
Kent Bruner
Kent Bruner
Posts: 1
One way to avoid shifting is to let the glue set for about 10 minutes and then drive the screws. If you don't have a lot of pieces but have a lot of patience then this works well.

You can also use dabs of hot glue spaced out across the end of the piece with yellow glue covering most of the wood. For instance, you may use 3 dabs of hot glue - one on each end and one in the middle - and regular wood glue between the dabs as you normally would apply it. Just enough hot glue to be a temporary clamp to prevent shifting.

Another way is to drive the screws without glue and then remove them, apply glue and reassemble.
edited by clg30522 on 2/11/2018
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