Rustic Farmhouse Table

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buildsomething added on 2/25/2016

The classic look of a farmhouse table is as popular today as ever—and not just in farmhouses. A farmhouse table looks great in an urban loft or suburban home. That’s because this type of table offers simple styling, solid construction, and versatility that make it useful and beautiful.

Directions

Follow the steps below to complete this project.

1

Make the End Parts

Start by cutting the parts for the end assemblies. Cut four Leg Posts to length from a 4x4 board, as shown in the cutting diagram. Then, from 2x4 boards, cut two Leg Inner Caps, Two Leg Outer Caps, two Leg Inner Bases, two Leg Outer Bases, and four Feet. Sand all of the parts smooth.

 TIP: TIPS FOR MITER SAW SUCCESS

A miter saw is the best tool for cutting your table parts to length because it makes it easy to make a controlled, straight, and square. Plus, a miter saw has the capacity to cut all the way through the 4x4 leg posts. When cutting, use stop blocks and cut all like parts before moving on to the next parts. This will help ensure accuracy, and minimize setup changes

2

Assemble the Ends

Now you can glue and screw the parts together to create two end assemblies. First, spread glue on the ends of the Leg Posts. Align the Leg Inner Base and Leg Inner Cap with the Leg Posts, as shown, and then clamp everything. Drill two pilot holes through the Cap and Base in to the ends of the Leg Posts at each position. Then drive in 3" screws. Next, position, glue, and clamp the Leg Outer Base and Leg Outer Cap. Drill pilot holes and attach them using 2 1/2" screws. Also attach the Feet using glue and more 2 1/2" screws. Finally, add pocket holes on the inside face of each end assembly, as shown. These will be used to help secure the table top later. To drill these holes, set your pocket hole jig and bit for 1 1/2" material.

3

Make the Table Rails

Now you can make the rail assembly that spans between the table ends. Cut two Outer Rails, two Inner Rails, and three Cross Rails to length from 2x4 boards, as shown in the cutting diagram. With your pocket hole jig set for 1 1/2" material, drill pocket holes in these parts, as shown. Sand all of the parts smooth.

4

Assemble the Rails

Next, put the rail assembly together, as shown. Position the parts where shown, making sure that all of the pocket holes that will attach the top later are pointed in the same direction. Attach all of the rails using 2 1/2" coarse-thread pocket-hole screws.

5

Connect the Rails to the Ends

Attach the rail assembly to the ends. The easiest way to do this is to lay the rail assembly on a flat surface, making sure the pocket holes that will attach the top are oriented correctly. Then position the end assemblies and attach them using 2 1/2" coarse-thread pocket-hole screws.

6

Cut the Top Parts

Cut six Top Slats to length from 2x6 boards, as shown in the cutting diagram. Also cut two Breadboard Ends. You can set those aside for the moment. Then, with your pocket hole jig set for 1 1/2" material, drill pocket holes in the ends of all six Top Slats, as shown. Set one Top Slat aside, and then drill pocket holes along one edge of the other five Slats, where shown. Sand all of the Slats and the Breadboard Ends.

7

Assemble the Top

With the top parts done, you can assemble them to create the table top. Position the Slats as shown, and spread glue along the mating edges. Clamp them together making sure that all of the ends are flush. Attach the Top Slats to one another using 2 1/2" coarse-thread pocket-hole screws. Then attach each Breadboard End to the Top Slats using 2 1/2" coarse-thread pocket-hole screws. You can go without glue here, which will allow for any movement that may be caused by the Top Slats expanding or contracting with seasonal humidity changes.

8

Stain & Paint before Final Assembly

Before you attach the top, it’s a good idea to apply stain, paint, or clear finish. It’s a lot easier to get to the pieces. Plus, if you plan to paint the base and stain the top as we did, you won’t have to worry about masking. Let the paint and stain dry before moving to final assembly.

9

Attach the Top

Lay the table top assembly face down on a flat surface, suing a blanket to protect the table surface. Then position the table base. Make sure the overhangs are equal on both ends and on both edges. Then secure the top using 2 1/2" coarse-thread pocket-hole screws, and your rustic farmhouse table is done!

Tools Used:

Materials Required:

Wood Products:

(7) 2x6, 96", Board  
(6) 2x4, 96", Board  
(1) 4x4, 96", Board  

Hardware/Supplies:

Parts/Cut List:

(4) Leg Post, 3 1/2" x 3 1/2" x 20"  
(2) Leg Inner Cap, 1 1/2" x 3 1/2" x 27 1/2"  
(2) Leg Outer Cap, 1 1/2" x 3 1/2" x 31"  
(2) Leg Inner Base, 1 1/2" x 3 1/2" x 25 1/2"  
(2) Leg Outer Base, 1 1/2" x 3 1/2" x 29"  
(4) Foot, 1 1/2" x 3 1/2" x 7"  
(2) Outer Rail, 1 1/2" x 3 1/2" x 66"  
(3) Inner Rail, 1 1/2" x 3 1/2" x 21"  
(2) Cross Rail, 1 1/2" x 3 1/2" x 24 1/2"  
(6) Top Slat, 1 1/2" x 5 1/2" x 90"  
(2) Breadboard End, 1 1/2" x 5 1/2" x 33"  

Extras:

No extra details have been uploaded.  

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