Outdoor Chaise Lounge

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buildsomething added on 10/6/2015

Kick back in comfort outside with this great-looking outdoor chaise lounge. It’s built with a shape that cradles your body and keeps you from sliding down. The shape doesn’t add much challenge to the build, though. Just cut a few pieces at an angle with your miter saw, and you’re all set.

Directions

Follow the steps below to complete this project.

1

Select and Check Your Boards

The first step, of course, is to get the materials for your project. We used cedar 1x6s. The thickness of cedar boards can vary. Many stores sell cedar that is 7/8" thick. Check your material thickness. If it’s 7/8", you'll be fine using the 1 1/2"-long pocket holes screws and jig settings recommended here. Some stores, though, sell cedar that is thinner. If your chaise material is actually 3/4"- or 11/16" thick, you'll want to substitute 1 1/4"-long screws, and set up your pocket hole jig for 3/4"-thick material.

2

Cut the Leg Rails

Cut two Leg Rails to length from 1x6 cedar boards, as shown in the cutting diagram. Note that one end is cut square, and the other is cut at a 10° angle. The overall length is measured on the long edge of the Leg Rail.

3

Cut the Back Rails

Cut two Back Rails to length from 1x6 cedar boards, as shown in the cutting diagram. Note that one end is cut square, and the other is cut at a 30° angle. The overall length is measured on the long edge of the Leg Rail.

4

Make the Seat Rails

Cut two Seat Rails to length from 1x6 cedar boards, as shown in the cutting diagram. Note that for these, one end is cut at a 10° angle, and the other end is cut at 25°. The overall length is measured on the long edge of the Leg Rail. Your cedar boards will probably be rough on one face and smooth on the other. Make sure when you cut your Seat Rails that you create "mirror image" parts that will have the smooth face on the outside of both pieces. Then, with your pocket hole jig set for 7/8" material (see Step 1), drill pocket holes at each end of the Seat Rails. Be sure to put the pocket holes in the rough face of the Rails.

5

Assemble the Sides

Now you can assemble the sides. To ensure that everything lines up, it's a good idea to lay the pieces out against a straight edge, such as a scrap board, as shown. Spread glue on the ends of the Seat Rails, and then attach them to the Leg Rails and Back Rails using 1 1/2" exterior pocket hole screws (see Step 1).

6

Make the Slats

Now you can cut 16 Slats to length from 1x6 boards, as shown in the cutting diagram. Then, with your pocket hole jig set up for 7/8" stock (see Step 1), drill pocket holes in each end of the Slats. Be sure to put the pocket holes in the rough face of each Slat.

7

Attach the Slats to one Side

After sanding the exposed face of the side assemblies and the Slats, you can lay attach the Slats to one side assembly. Lay one side assembly on a flat on a work surface, and then screw one slat on flush with the end of the Leg Rail. Attach another Slat flush with the end of the Back Rail. Use 1 1/2" exterior pocket hole screws. Then attach the remaining slats, leaving 1/4" gaps in between.

8

Make a Pair of Braces

Now it's time to make a pair of Braces. These are used to reinforce the joint between the Leg Rail and Seat Rail. Even though this joint is glued and assembled with pocket screws, this type of end-to-end joint in soft cedar needs a bit more strength. Cut two Braces to length from a 1x4 board, as shown in the cutting diagram. Then drill 1/8" holes through each Brace where shown.

9

Attach One Brace

Now you can attach one of the braces to the side assembly you just screwed the Slats to. Spread glue on the back of the brace, and then attach it with 1 1/4" wood screws. You don't need to position the Brace in any exact position. It just needs to straddle the joint.

10

Add the Second Side

Lay the second side assembly down on a flat surface, and then position the partially assembled chair on top of it. Then attach the Slats, making sure each one is aligned as you go. A helper may come in handy here. Finally, add the other Brace.

11

Apply a Finish

With the chair all together, you can do any final sanding that's needed. Then apply the stain or finish of your choice. We used a mid-tone stain meant for decks. Apply plentty and let it soak in, and then wipe off any excess. Once the stain dries, you can kick back and relax in comfort in your new chaise.

Tools Used:

Materials Required:

Wood Products:

 (6) 1x6, 96", Board  
 (1) 1x4, 96", Board  

Hardware/Supplies:

Parts/Cut List:

(2) Leg Rail, 7/8" x 5 1/2" x 30"  
(2) Seat Rail, 7/8" x 5 1/2" x 23"  
(2) Back Rail, 7/8" x 5 1/2" x 41 1/2"  
(16) Slat, 7/8" x 5 1/2" x 23 1/2"  
(2) Brace, 7/8" x 3 1/2" x 15"  

Extras:

No extra details have been uploaded.  

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